WALLIS AND FUTUNA
Territory of the Wallis and Futuna Islands
Territoire des Iles Wallis et Futuna
(Overseas territory of France)
Joined United Nations:  24 October 1945
Human Rights as assured by their constitution
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Updated 01 April 2013
CAPITAL
POPULATION
CHIEF OF STATE
SELECTION PROCESS
Mata-Utu (on Ile Uvea)
15,453 (July 2012 est.)
Francois Hollande
President of France since 15 May 2012
French president elected by popular vote for a five-year term;
high administrator appointed by the French president on the
advice of the French Ministry of the Interior; election last held
22 April and 6 May 2012

Next scheduled election: Spring 2017
HEAD OF GOVERNMENT
SELECTION PROCESS
President of the Territorial Assembly is elected by the members
of the Territorial Assembly in the recommendation of the French
President for five-year terms (no term limits) Last election: 04
April 2012

Next scheduled election: Spring 2017
DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS
ETHNIC GROUPS
Polynesian
RELIGIONS
Roman Catholic 99%, other 1%
GOVERNMENT
STRUCTURE
Overseas Territory of France . No administrative divisions but there are three kingdoms at the second order named Alo,
Sigave, Wallis. Legal system is the French legal system
Executive: - Popularly elected in France for five year term represented by prefect, President of the Territorial Assembly
is elected by the members of the Territorial Assembly for five-year terms (no term limits). Last election: 04 April 2012;
Next election: Spring 2017
Legislative: Unicameral Territorial Assembly or Assemblee Territoriale (20 seats; members are elected by popular vote
to serve five-year terms)
elections: last held 2
4 March 2013 (next to be held Spring 2017)
Judicial: None; justice generally administered under French law by the high administrator, but the three traditional kings
administer customary law and there is a magistrate in Mata-Utu; a court of appeal is located in Noumea, New Caledonia
LANGUAGES
Wallisian 58.9% (indigenous Polynesian language), Futunian 30.1%, French 10.8%, other 0.2% (2003 census)
BRIEF HISTORY
Wallis is named after the eighteenth century English explorer Samuel Wallis. Some people call the island East 'Uvea to
distinguish it from an island off the east coast of New Caledonia, known as West 'Uvea, which was settled two hundred
years ago by people from East 'Uvea. The population is of Tongan ancestry. Futuna was called the Hoorn Islands by
Dutch explorers. Futuna includes the nearby uninhabited island of Alofi. The 'Uvean language is a Western Polynesian
language closely related to Tongan. Wallisians use 'Uvean as their everyday language. All school-age and older persons
also speak French, the language of the administration. A few people also speak English. The Futunan language is of
Samoic origin. It is the language of everyday life, though French is used on official occasions and is taught in schools.
The island of Wallis lies in the central Pacific. It is a raised reef, mainly limestone, with an area of ninety-six square miles
(250 square kilometers). It is surrounded by a wide lagoon with many small islets. There are no rivers but several lakes in
the interior plateau. Better soil is found on the coastal rim, where large trees and crops are cultivated. The villages are in
this coastal region, predominantly on the eastern side. The western side is uninhabited; several of the larger islets are
inhabited. The lagoon is shallow, and barely navigable. The island is divided into three districts. Mu'a, the most populous;
Hahake; and Hihifo. The main town where government offices and the hospital are located is Mata'utu in Hahake in the
central district. Futuna lies one hundred miles southwest of Wallis. Futuna and Alofi are volcanic islands. Futuna is
twenty-five square miles (64 square kilometers), and Alofi is eleven square miles (28 square kilometers) in area. A narrow
reef encircles both islands, but there is no lagoon. People cultivate the hillsides and use the banks of streams to grow taro.
The island is divided by several major rivers, and the population lives in the southern coastal zone. The island is divided
into two kingdoms: Sigave in the west and Alo in the east. Leava in Sigave is the main town and port. Although the Dutch
and the British were the European discoverers of the islands in the 17th and 18th centuries, it was the French who were
the first Europeans to settle in the territory, with the arrival of French missionaries in 1837, who converted the population
to Catholicism. Wallis is named after the Cornish explorer Samuel Wallis. On April 5, 1842, they asked for the protection
of France after the rebellion of a part of the local population. On April 5, 1887, the queen of Uvea (on the island of
Wallis) signed a treaty officially establishing a French protectorate. The kings of Sigave and Tu´a (Alo) on the islands of
Futuna and Alofi also signed a treaty establishing French protectorate on February 16, 1888. The islands were put under
the authority of the French colony of New Caledonia. In 1917, the three traditional chiefdoms were annexed to France
and turned into the Colony of Wallis and Futuna, still under the authority of the Colony of New Caledonia. In 1959, the
inhabitants of the islands voted to become a French overseas territory, effective in 1961, thus ending their subordination to
New Caledonia. In 2005, the 50th king, Tomasi Kulimoetoke II, faced being deposed after giving sanctuary to his
grandson who was convicted of manslaughter. The king claimed his grandson should be judged by tribal law rather than
by the French penal system. There were riots in the streets involving the king's supporters, who were victorious over
attempts to replace the king. Two years later, Tomasi Kulimoetoke died on 7 May 2007. The state was in a six-month
period of mourning. During this period, mentioning a successor was forbidden. On 25 July 2008, Kapiliele Faupala was
installed as king despite protests from some of the royal clans. Elections for Territorial Assembly and Permanent
Commission presidents were held in April 2012.
President of the Territorial Assembly Vetelino Nau was replaced in
November 2012 by Sosefo Suve however, due to a loss of vote of confidence, a n election was held on 24 March 2013
resulting in the election of Nivaleta Iloai as the new President of the Territorial Assembly.
New Prefect Michel Aubion
w
as appointed to office on 3 March 2013.
Sources:  Every Culture.com: Culture of Wallis and Futuna; Wikipedia: History of Wallis and Futuna
ECONOMIC OVERVIEW
Politics of Wallis and Futuna takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic French overseas
collectivity, whereby the President of the Territorial Assembly is the head of government, and of a multi-party system.
Executive power is exercised by the government.

The territory of Wallis and Futuna is divided into three traditional chiefdoms (royaumes coutumiers): `Uvea, on the
island of Wallis, Sigave, on the western part of the island of Futuna, and Tu`a (Alo), on the island of Alofi and on the
eastern part of the island of Futuna. Uvea is further subdivided into three districts: Hanake, Hihifo, and Mua. The
capital of the territory is Matâ'Utu on the island of Wallis, the most populated island. As a territory of France, it is
governed under the French constitution of September 28, 1958, uses both the French legal system and customary local
laws ("coutume") , and suffrage is universal for those over 18 years of age. The French president elected by popular
vote for a five-year term; the high administrator is appointed by the French president on the advice of the French
Ministry of the Interior; the presidents of the Territorial Government and the Territorial Assembly are elected by the
members of the assembly. Mr. Nau, who is a retired teacher from Alo on Futuna, won 11 of the assembly’s 20 votes
and succeeds Pesamino Taputai. Petelo Hanisi was elected to the Territorial Government
Source: Wikipedia: Politics of Wallis and Futuna
POLITICAL CLIMATE
The economy is limited to traditional subsistence agriculture, with about 80% of labor force earnings from agriculture
(coconuts and vegetables), livestock (mostly pigs), and fishing. About 4% of the population is employed in government.
Revenues come from French Government subsidies, licensing of fishing rights to Japan and South Korea, import taxes,
and remittances from expatriate workers in New Caledonia.
Source:  CIA World Factbook (select Wallis and Futuna)
INTERNATIONAL
DISPUTES
None reported.
U.S. State Department
United Nations Human
Rights Council
Amnesty International
Human Rights Watch
Freedom House
REFUGEES AND
INTERNALLY
DISPLACED PERSONS
(IDP)
None reported.
ILLICIT DRUGS
None reported.
Wallis Et La Droit
U. S. STATE
DEPARTMENT
HUMAN RIGHTS STATEMENTS, ANALYSIS AND CRITIQUES
2011 Human Rights Report: France (including Wallis and Futuna)
Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor
2011 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices
May 25, 2012

The government took steps to prosecute and punish security force and other officials who committed abuses. Impunity was not
widespread.

Note: The country includes 11 overseas administrative divisions that are covered in this report. Four overseas territories in French
Guiana, Guadeloupe, Martinique, and Reunion, have the same political status as the 22 metropolitan regions and 101 departments on
the mainland. Five divisions are overseas “collectivities”: French Polynesia, Saint-Barthelemy, Saint-Martin, Saint-Pierre and Miquelon,
and Wallis and Futuna. New Caledonia is a special overseas collectivity with a unique, semiautonomous status between an independent
country and an overseas department. Mayotte became the 101st department on March 31, 2011. Citizens of these territories
periodically elect deputies and senators to represent them in parliament, like the other overseas regions and departments.
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UNITED NATIONS
HUMAN RIGHTS
COUNCIL
Analysis
Australia On UN Security Council Can’t Avoid Pacific Decolonization
By Nic Maclellan
AUCKLAND, New Zealand (Pacific Scoop, Oct. 31, 2012)

The successful bid for a rotating seat on the United Nations Security Council places Australia in an interesting place. Over the next
few years, the country will be in the spotlight as the United Nations addresses hot-button international issues: maritime disputes
between China and its Asia-Pacific neighbors; the prospects for Palestinian statehood; negotiations for a global climate treaty and a
new compact to replace the Millennium Development Goals after 2015.

But closer engagement with the United Nations will also create a few thorny dilemmas on issues that receive less international attention.

One often ignored issue is the future of the UN Special Committee on Decolonization and the lack of international action to complete
the UN agenda on self-determination and political independence.

Decolonization was a major achievement for the UN in the 20th century, but international attention on the issue faded after the
independence of most African colonies on the UN list of non-self-governing territories (with the remaining exception of Western
Sahara).

Even as international debates on statehood are reviving, from South Sudan to Scotland and Catalonia, the UN lacks the capacity to
support the remaining territories seeking full sovereign independence or free association with their administering power.

The United States and other administering powers regularly intervene at UN budgetary committees in favor of reducing resources for
work on decolonization.

The Special Committee and UN Decolonization Unit have been shunted aside in the UN bureaucracy, lacking the staff and finances to
complete their mandate.

Limited results

With the third International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism well under way, there have been limited results from the two
previous decades since 1990.

For Australia, however, the issue is not going away. Just as East Timor’s political transition has engaged Canberra for decades, so the
issue of self-determination in neighboring island territories remains on the regional agenda.

This is made more complex by the varying status of self-determination struggles in our region under international law.

Firstly, there are cases of 19th century "blue-water" colonialism by Western powers, such as France (New Caledonia, French
Polynesia and Wallis and Futuna), the United States (Guam and American Samoa), Britain (Pitcairn) and New Zealand (Tokelau).
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FREEDOM HOUSE
No reports from Freedom House mentioning Wallis and Futuna after exhaustive search of their data base. Please forward
any information you may have regarding Freedom House efforts on behalf of Wallis and Futuna to the Pax Gaea World
Report editor at the link below.
Contact the editor »
AMNESTY
INTERNATIONAL
No Reports from Amnesty International mentioning Wallis and Futuna after exhaustive search of their data Base. Please
forward any information you may have regarding Amnesty International  efforts on behalf of Wallis and Futuna to the Pax
Gaea World Report editor at the link below
Contact the editor »
HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH
No reports from Human Rights Watch mentioning Wallis and Futuna after exhaustive search of their data base. Please
forward any information you may have regarding Human Rights Watch efforts on behalf of Wallis and Futuna to the Pax
Gaea World Report editor at the link below.
Contact the editor »
OFFICIAL GOVERNMENT
HUMAN
RIGHTS
STATEMENT
TRANSLATED FROM FRENCH BY GOOGLE TRANSLATE
Declaration of Association
I. Role of the Department of Regulation and Elections (SRE) in association
01/08/2012

a) Recording
The role of SRE - Associations section is:

 recording and monitoring of associations (creation, modification and dissolution of nonprofit organizations governed by the law of
1st July 1901 and its implementing decree of 16 August 1901);
 the registration of the association on the National Register of Associations (RNA);

 educate the public on various legal issues relating to association.

b) Time
According to the regulations, an association has a period of three months to rectify the situation with the Administration. At its
inception, the association has a period of one month to place its creation in the Official Journal of Wallis and Futuna (JOWF).

The Authority has a period of 5 days to issue a receipt for the creation, modification or dissolution.

c) Publication in the Official Journal of Wallis and Futuna
The publication in JOWF is required when creating the association. It is the same for changes in the title, headquarters and the
object of the association.

However, it is optional during a renewal office, dissolution and changes in the statutes with the exception of the changes outlined
above (title, headquarters and object).
II. Documents types and procedures

a) Creation (see the model in PDF)
application/pdf Enregistrement_association 45.09 kB | 01/08/2012

When you create an association, the procedure is as follows:

 Step 1: the office of the new association shall file with the Associations section the initial declaration of association, minutes of
one general assembly accompanied by a copy of the Constitution 2. All documents listed must be dated and signed by minimum 2
persons office (president and another board member). It is imperative to include the documents on behalf of the association,
address of the registered office, date and two signatures.
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MINISTERE DE LA
JUSTICE  REPUBLIQUE
DE FRANCE
TRANSLATED FROM FRENCH BY GOOGLE TRANSLATE
Report of the Council of Ministers on 31 October 2012
ORDER - LEGAL PROTECTION OF WALLIS AND FUTUNA, FRENCH POLYNESIA AND IN NEW
CALEDONIA

Minister of Overseas introduced an ordinance on the extension and adaptation Wallis and Futuna, French Polynesia and New
Caledonia to the provisions of the civil law and the right to social action on the legal protection of adults.

The order extends and adapts to these three communities to the provisions of the Civil Code relating to the conditions under
which a person may be placed under protection and how to implement it, including the designation of the person responsible for
exercising function of curator or guardian, who may be a family member, a relative or legal representative to the protection of
adults.

In addition, the text extends and adapts the three communities to the provisions of the law of 5 March 2007 on the reform of the
legal protection of, relating to conditions of implementation of legal safeguards and judicial officers by the judicial protection
majors.

Legal services attorneys, in France, are on the authorization and control regime applicable to all services and social and
medico-social governed by Article L. 312-1 of the Code of Social Action and Families. This plan is not applicable to Wallis and
Futuna, French Polynesia and New Caledonia as social protection is the responsibility of local authorities. A specific system of
authorization and control is created in order for proxy services to the protection of adults in these communities.
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WALLIS ET LA DROIT
TRANSLATED FROM FRENCH BY GOOGLE TRANSLATE
Wallis and Futuna
Version of 19 April 2012
Legislative and regulatory regime

Until the intervention of organic provisions laid down in Article 74 of the Constitution as amended by the Constitutional Law n °
2003-276 of 28 March 2003 , the legislative and regulatory Wallis and Futuna remains defined by the law n ° 61-814 of 29 July
1961, as amended giving the Wallis and Futuna Islands the status of overseas territory whose Article 4 provides:

"The territory of Wallis and Futuna Islands is now governed:

a) By the laws of the Republic and decrees applicable because they object to the entire national territory and, upon their
promulgation in the territory, by the laws, decrees and ministerial orders declared specifically applicable to territories overseas or
territory of Wallis and Futuna Islands;

b) In the regulations for the administration of the territory by the High Commissioner of the Republic in the Pacific Ocean or the
Senior Administrator of the Territory of Wallis and Futuna, each under the powers conferred upon it by this law and the decrees
will be taken for its implementation.

Laws, decrees and orders referred to above and a regulation made by the High Commissioner of the French Republic in the Pacific
Ocean or the Resident Commissioner of France in Wallis and Futuna Islands delegate and Futuna made prior to the date of
enactment of this Act local, are and shall remain applicable to the territory of Wallis and Futuna Islands without special enactment,
for all that is not contrary to the provisions of the said Act.

Own laws and decrees in New Caledonia and in force in that territory at the date of enactment of this Act Local may, with the
exception of those relating to the specific organization of the territory, be extended by decree to territory Wallis and Futuna Islands,
after consultation with the territorial assembly. '

The laws of sovereignty are nevertheless applicable law. It is the same under the Article 4-1 of the Law of 29 July 1961, amended
by Organic Law n ° 2007-223 of 21 February 2007, regulations that define individual acts should not be to be published in
electronic form and those that define the categories of administrative acts whose publication in the Official Journal of the French
Republic in electronic form sufficient to ensure the entry into force.
Terms of entry into force of the texts

It follows from the Article 4-1 of the Law of 29 July 1961 from the above I of Article 16 of the Organic Law of 21 February 2007
that the entry into force of the legislative and administrative in Wallis and Futuna Islands as well as the conditions and effects of the
publication of proceedings in electronic form in the Official Journal of the French Republic are governed by provisions similar to
those applicable in France with one difference: the laws and when they are published in the Official Journal of the French Republic,
the administrative acts, if they do not set their own date of entry into force or are not subject, in the case of emergency, an act
prescribing the entry into force upon publication, shall enter into force not the day after their publication in the Official Journal but
only the tenth day following it. This ten-day period does not however apply to texts that because of their purpose, are necessarily
intended to govern the whole territory of the Republic and, unless otherwise specified, shall enter into force on the day of
publication ( CC No. 2007-547 DC of 15 February 2007).

The entry into force of the laws and regulations in the Wallis and Futuna Islands is thus not subject to publication in the Official
Journal of the Wallis and Futuna Islands, that this section does not provide for information purposes only.
Consultations

In addition to the consultation provided for in Article 74 of the Constitution of the organic provisions adopted for its
implementation, Wallis and Futuna must be consulted under these provisions that will establish organic, projects and legislative
proposals and projects order or decree includes provisions specific to the community, as well as the ratification or approval of
international agreements concluded on matters within its competence.
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Represented by
Michel Auboin
Prefect and High Administrator
since 02 March 2013
Nivaleta Iloai
President of the Territorial Assembly
Since 24 March 2013
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Click on flag for Country Report
TRAFFICKING IN
PERSONS
None reported.
Petelo Hanisi
President of the Territorial Government
Since 04 April 2012